Journalctl. Which configuration option journald is more correct?

journald allows to configure itself through the configuration file or the command line.
SystemMaxUse= the maximum volume that the logs can occupy on the disk.
SystemKeepFree= — the amount of free space that must remain on disk after you save the log information;
SystemMaxFileSize= — the volume of log file at which it must be deleted from disk.
RuntimeMaxUse= the maximum volume that the logs can occupy in the file system /run;
RuntimeKeepFree= — the amount of free space that should remain on the filesystem /run after saving the logs;
RuntimeMaxFileSize= — the volume of log file at which it must be deleted from the file system /run.

journalctl --vacuum-size=1G
journalctl --vacuum-time=1years

Which option is more correct given the of saving settings after reboot or shutdown?
June 3rd 19 at 18:57
1 answer
June 3rd 19 at 18:59
I would have the place set up. but, I have over a year of logs much more than 1Gb, typed =)
well. Is it worth it to have the archive logs on the file server with the OS installation? Also, second question). What to do about the maximum size for the logs? - Rene commented on June 3rd 19 at 19:02
well, the question in the specific system. if it's loot, etc, the logs should be stored forever, if this issue of images of cute cats free logs can never keep... - mona commented on June 3rd 19 at 19:05
of course - money is evil. And here's another question... Why database files logs are open for all to read. Can't understand why anyone can find out what is happening on the server? - Rene commented on June 3rd 19 at 19:08
in debian root is required:adm to read the syslog... - mona commented on June 3rd 19 at 19:11
and journald creates a database with the ability to read for everyone. This is a fight for half a day. But I can not understand why syslog is limited to read, as a newer systemd - journald with such architecture - Rene commented on June 3rd 19 at 19:14

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