It is easier to reverse engineer a hacker: C/C++ code with -O1 or LuaJIT code?

Of course, no hints in the code the debugger.
March 23rd 20 at 19:02
3 answers
March 23rd 20 at 19:04
Solution
You are comparing two different technologies. LuaJIT is words language, decompiled it in General without problems.
And so, in principle, a deep purple that reversal.
JIT compiles bytecode to native code. Isn't it? - arvel_King commented on March 23rd 20 at 19:07
@arvel_King, Yes, sorry, mixed up with lua :)
But it doesn't change the fact, when reverseengineering work with engine teams and absolutely fialetovo what language you put bytes in the register.
But again-zhezh it is necessary to understand that such things are done for the sake of the bypass licensing, etc., and it is unlikely that someone would be so reversity app for getting close copies, it's easier to write from scratch knowing the functionality :) - vena.Ullrich46 commented on March 23rd 20 at 19:10
March 23rd 20 at 19:06
depends on the experience.
If faced with LuaJIT, then LuaJIT if encountered with C/C++, then C/C++.

Like hacking the system of education does not exist.
March 23rd 20 at 19:08
Because interpretively Lua language. Why should it be decompile?
From the point of view of protection against hacker, it is not necessary at first to think about hackers. Better, on the contrary, to make the platform as open as possible and available for distribution.
Because interpretively Lua language

And the word JIT says nothing? Then maybe Google a bit before to answer the question. - isobel_Becker97 commented on March 23rd 20 at 19:11
@isobel_Becker97, and that I had to Google before I answer? - Jettie.Wisozk commented on March 23rd 20 at 19:14
@Noe.Wisozk, Lua != LuaJIT
as Javascript != Java - Elouise_Heathco commented on March 23rd 20 at 19:17
@Elouise_Heathco, I know. What is illogical in my answer? - Jettie.Wisozk commented on March 23rd 20 at 19:20
@Noe.Wisozk, the fact that Lua is an interpreted language, and LuaJIT - compiled. - Elouise_Heathco commented on March 23rd 20 at 19:23
@Elouise_Heathco, as far as I understand code is compiled to machine code during program execution rather than in advance. That is similar to the interpretation of the code. Then it is unclear what is meant by protected Lua code.
I wonder what @isobel_Becker97 add this to it.
If I'm wrong about something, please explain briefly in your own words. - Jettie.Wisozk commented on March 23rd 20 at 19:26
Lua and LuaJit can compile your code to bytecode, so distribute your scripts in source is not necessary. In addition, it seemed to me that the jit is able to generate machine code and, if not for the whole script, but apparently it is not machine code and, indeed, is only generated on the fly, during execution. - isobel_Becker97 commented on March 23rd 20 at 19:29
@Elouise_Heathco, for the record: lua bytecode and luajit are different and not interchangeable. LuaJit can run in 2 modes: only interpretation or the interpretation of the jit compilation. Based on the information on the website, even in the only mode of interpretation, the speed he overtakes just lua in a couple of times. - isobel_Becker97 commented on March 23rd 20 at 19:32
@isobel_Becker97, it's a little sad news. Thought you could pre-compile for a specific platform. - arvel_King commented on March 23rd 20 at 19:35

Find more questions by tags LuaProtection against hackingReverse engineeringC++