Do I set up a discrete graphics card in the laptop for maximum performance?

So there is a laptop HP Pavilion 15-p055sr G7W94EA

System type:
Intel(R) Core(TM) i5-4210U CPU © 1.70 GHz 2.40 GHz
64-bit operating system, x64 processor
Memory frequency 1600 MHz
Memory type DDR3L SDRAM
Random access memory (RAM) 4 GB
Integrated graphics+GeForce 840M 2 GB
Hard disk 500 GB Seagate ST500LT012 Laptop Thin
The rotational speed 5400 rpm
Use for programming in C/C++/java in eclipse and idea and surfing the Internet using chrome.

As I have little RAM, and integrated graphics card uses for itself, the RAM of the laptop (which is only 4GB), I decided to only use the discrete card with its own memory, by configuring the program "nvidia control panel".

Actually 4 questions.

1. If I'm right that involves only the discrete card only by selecting it through the "nvidia control panel" (see figure 1 ) or embedded videos should be off on the other?

2. Do I set up a discrete graphics card in the laptop for maximum performance (see figure 1)?

Figure 1.
5a70bd702d657682859823.png

3. Why not in all programs it is possible to use a discrete graphics card, especially windows applications and the various video players (see gif)?

GIF

eUwo2rFHuP.gif

4. Why some programs - nvidia uses all global settings except for "power management" and it always puts Adaptive and not maximum performance as a global parameter (see figure 2)? Can adaptive mode better mode max. performance?

Figure 2.

5a70c1c05a32d889853182.png

P. S. whether it is Possible for the laptop to completely shut down integrated graphics?
June 8th 19 at 17:24
1 answer
June 8th 19 at 17:26
Whether it is possible for the laptop to completely shut down integrated graphics?

Options:
1. Disable in the BIOS
2. Disabled in "device Manager" (is "disable" not "delete")

Before starting the experiment, remember in "task Manager" memory "hardware reserved" is the amount of memory for integrated graphics.

PS. I recommend an upgrade to at least 8 gig memory.

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