How to use GPL libraries in commercial products?

If I take the source code of the library, distributed under the GNU GPLv2 license.0, rewrite it by changing the names of functions, classes, variables, change the order of Declaration and implementation of functions, the order of executable code and release a library under the new license incompatible with the GNU GPLv2.0, it is technically possible to prove the violation? Was there any cases of bringing to responsibility for the described actions?
June 14th 19 at 21:04
3 answers
June 14th 19 at 21:06
These things what? - arturo_Armstrong43 commented on June 14th 19 at 21:09
June 14th 19 at 21:08
it can be used

for the very litsuhu not really suing will be, if you're not a giant, who cut off

but for breach of copyright - Bob is very easy
> for the very litsuhu not really suing will be, if you're not a giant, who cut off
> but for breach of copyright - Bob is very easy

I was not able to understand you clearly. - arturo_Armstrong43 commented on June 14th 19 at 21:11
June 14th 19 at 21:10
> How to use GPL libraries in commercial products?

Exactly the same as any other. It's a free license, so she , by definition, returns the right to use this work for any purpose, including commercial.

> If I ... [change] the names of functions, classes, variables, procedure declarations and implementations of functions, the order of executable code and release a library under the new license incompatible with the GNU GPLv2.0, it is technically possible to prove the violation?

Yes.

> Were there any cases of bringing to responsibility for the described actions?

I do not know any. Not any nonsense, which can be described, someone actually does.
so it is you, by definition, returns the right to use this work for any purpose, including commercial.

And obliges to open the associated code of a commercial product, Yes. (there are nuances of course, but it's not like business) - arturo_Armstrong43 commented on June 14th 19 at 21:13

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